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F.T.A.
1972, 96 min, USA, Dir: Francine Parker

Produced by Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland, F.T.A. is a witty and moving film that chronicles opposition to the Vietnam War. Fonda and Sutherland, along with Holly Near, Michael Alaimo, Rita Martinson and Len Chandler, entertained American troops with a satirical revue called (in the polite version) “Free the Army.” The original theatrical release was curtailed under somewhat mysterious circumstances so the film was never widely seen and reemerges now as an essential piece of cinema and social history.


THE PROWLER
1951, Crystal Pictures, 92 min, USA, Dir: Joseph Losey

A perverse, provocative film about a corrupt cop (Van Heflin) who sexually dominates a married woman (Evelyn Keyes) for material gain. Oh yeah, he murders her husband in the process - then marries her. And she ends up giving birth in a Nevada ghost town. Hands down, Keyes’ best performance. Heflin’s desperate pursuit of his skewed vision of the American Dream lingers in the memory – potent, haunting and disturbingly similar to today’s headline news. A rediscovered masterpiece not to be missed!


JEALOUSY
1945, Republic, 71 min, USA, Dir: Gustav Machatý

A perky female cabbie (Jane Randolph) gets embroiled in a dangerous triangle involving her suicidal writer husband (Nils Asther) and an aloof, high-toned doctor (John Loder) who takes a shine to her. Director Machatý, known for the scandalous 1933 ECSTASY, concocts a dreamy, off-kilter tale that touches all the tropes of “B” passion plays while also depicting the displacement of European artists adrift in sunbaked Hollywood. Part bargain-basement loopiness, part experimental art film ... and, not surprisingly, the last film the artistically inclined Machatý made in America. Featuring Karen Morley (at her best!) and Hugo Haas.


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