KAJILLIONAIRE
2020, Focus Features, 106 min, USA, Dir: Miranda July

From acclaimed writer-director Miranda July comes a profoundly moving and wildly original comedy. Con-artists Theresa (Debra Winger) and Robert (Richard Jenkins) have spent 26 years training their only daughter, Old Dolio (Evan Rachel Wood), to swindle, scam and steal at every opportunity. During a desperate, hastily conceived heist, they charm a stranger (Gina Rodriguez) into joining their next scam, only to have their entire world turned upside down. "As in ME AND YOU AND EVERYONE WE KNOW - where July also explored the universal human craving for connection - the wryly observant storyteller embraces a sense of everyday eccentricity while keeping her film’s feet firmly on the ground." - Peter Debruge, Variety.


OKJA
2017, Netflix, 120 min, South Korea/USA, Dir: Bong Joon Ho

A decade after biotech CEO Lucy Mirando (Tilda Swinton) launches a contest to raise the world’s finest genetically designed “super pig,” South Korean farm girl Mija (Ahn Seo-hyun) learns that her super pig, Okja, has won the title. When Okja is hauled off to be exhibited in New York City, Mija undertakes a rescue mission that puts her in league with the Animal Liberation Front – and into the clutches of the profit-minded Mirando Corporation. An imaginative adventure with friendship and humanity’s nearsightedness at its center, OKJA is a moving reminder that courage can take small forms.


IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK
2018, Annapurna Pictures, 119 min, USA, Dir: Barry Jenkins

Set in early-1970s Harlem, this adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel is a timeless and moving love story of both a couple’s unbreakable bond and the African-American family’s empowering embrace, as told through the eyes of 19-year-old Tish Rivers (newcomer KiKi Layne). She dreams of a future with her artist fiancé, Fonny (Stephan James), but the couple’s plans are derailed when the young man is arrested for a crime he did not commit. As Fonny’s weeks in prison turn to months, Tish draws upon inner strength and the unwavering support of her family to face the challenges of life without her partner at her side and the imminent arrival of the couple’s child. “In BEALE STREET as in MOONLIGHT, the director melds color, music and portraiture to do more than tell a story. By the time he’s finished, he seems to have transcended the conventional tools of filmmaking to work with pure emotion itself.” - Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post.


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