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THE SILENCE
TYSTNADEN
1963, Janus Films, 95 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

Two sisters - the sickly, intellectual Ester (Ingrid Thulin) and the sensual, pragmatic Anna (Gunnel Lindblom) - travel by train with Anna’s young son Johan (Jorgen Lindstrom) to a foreign country seemingly on the brink of war. Attempting to cope with their alien surroundings, the sisters resort to their personal vices while vying for Johan’s affection, and in so doing sabotage any hope for a future together. Regarded as one of the most sexually provocative films of its day, this drama offers a brilliant, disturbing vision of emotional isolation in a suffocating spiritual void.


ALL THESE WOMEN
FÖR ATT INTE TALA OM ALLA DESSA KVINNOR
1964, Janus Films, 80 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

Conceived as an amusing diversion in the wake of the despairing THE SILENCE, this comedy is Bergman’s first film in color, and it looks like a glorious chocolate box. Working from a bawdy screenplay he cowrote with actor Erland Josephson, about a supercilious critic drawn into the dizzying orbit of a famous cellist, Bergman brings together buoyant comic turns by a number of his frequent collaborators, including Jarl Kulle, Eva Dahlbeck, Harriet Andersson and Bibi Andersson. ALL THESE WOMEN, in which Bergman pokes fun at the pretensions of drawing-room art, possesses a distinctly playful atmosphere and a carefree rhythm.


WAITING WOMEN
KVINNORS VÄNTAN
1952, Janus Films, 107 min, Sweden, Dir: Ingmar Bergman

An early precursor to many Bergman classics - indicated by both its flashback structure and comedic timing - WAITING WOMEN is a charming film about three sisters who deliver personal accounts of the state of their marriages, ranging from brutally honest to genuinely funny and sweet. Known primarily for a hilarious flashback sequence involving a broken elevator, the film’s subtler humor is just as memorable, pointing toward the minimalism and restraint that Bergman would demonstrate throughout his career.


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