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WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR
1967, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese took the filmmaking world by storm at the 1967 Chicago International Film Festival with this New York City-set drama that is steeped in cinema history while forging ahead towards something new. Shrouded in the fog of Catholic guilt which so informs his later films, WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR is a haunting story of a young couples’ reckoning with a traumatizing event. Featuring the acting debut of Harvey Keitel, along with a memorable performance by Zina Bethune, the film, as critic Roger Ebert observed upon its premiere, was “absolutely genuine” and “a great moment in American movies.”


AFTER HOURS
1985, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Manhattan becomes a surreal dreamscape of bizarre terror in Martin Scorsese's film about an ordinary guy (Griffin Dunne) who agrees to a late-night date with an attractive but alarmingly disturbed woman (Rosanna Arquette). Dead bodies, strange sculptresses and an incensed ice cream truck mob are all part of the protagonist's weird journey into the dark and neglected hours of the morning.


THE DEPARTED
2006, Warner Bros., 151 min, USA/Hong Kong, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Inspired by Hong Kong film INFERNAL AFFAIRS, this riveting drama of divided loyalties will keep you guessing until the very last shot. In an effort to break Boston’s Irish-American mob, Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) goes undercover as part of crime boss Frank Costello’s (Jack Nicholson) crew. What he doesn’t know is that Costello has his own mole (Matt Damon) working in the police force. Winner of four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and a long-overdue Best Director statuette for Scorsese.


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