We’re thrilled to announce a complete re-design of the American Cinematheque website. See The New Site Now >
WHITE DOG
1982, Paramount, 89 min, USA, Dir: Sam Fuller

Virtually unseen outside of a few retrospective screenings, this film is the story of “a four-legged time bomb,” a powder-white German shepherd trained to attack black people. In a fit of inspired casting, teen queen Kristy McNichol (TV’s "Family") stars as the dog’s owner - but the film really belongs to Paul Winfield as an Ahab-like animal trainer, obsessed with de-programming the dog. Music by spaghetti Western composer Ennio Morricone.


SHAMPOO
1975, Sony Repertory, 109 min, USA, Dir: Hal Ashby

Director Hal Ashby’s classic mid-’70s comedy is a harsh and funny time capsule stuffed full of great performances. Warren Beatty excels as an amorous hairdresser contending with sexual politics and his many romantic entanglements, from the wife (Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner Lee Grant) of his business adviser Jack Warden to Warden’s mistress (Julie Christie) and teenage daughter (Carrie Fisher, in her first role). The film was nominated for four Academy Awards, including Best Original Screenplay for Beatty and Robert Towne.


BREAKING AWAY
1979, 20th Century Fox, 101 min, USA, Dir: Peter Yates

Four teenagers (Dennis Christopher, Dennis Quaid, Daniel Stern, Jackie Earle Haley) come of age in an Indiana university town where their status as "townies" creates numerous economic and emotional obstacles. Paul Dooley stands out in a uniformly excellent cast as the befuddled father of a young man who sees cycling as his way out of obscurity.


Syndicate content