We’re thrilled to announce a complete re-design of the American Cinematheque website. See The New Site Now >
CHARIOTS OF FIRE
1981, Warner Bros., 124 min, UK, Dir: Hugh Hudson

Based on actual events, this inspiring drama follows a pair of British runners in the 1924 Olympics: Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross) and Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson). Abrahams is a Jew who competes to battle anti-Semitism, while Liddell is a Christian who runs to glorify God - and confronts hurdles when he refuses to race on a Sunday. Named one of the top British films of all time by the British Film Institute, CHARIOTS OF FIRE won four Oscars, including Best Picture and Original Score (for Vangelis’ distinctive electronic music, forever linked to shots of young men in white running in slow motion along a beach).


BACK TO SCHOOL
1986, Park Circus/MGM, 96 min, USA, Dir: Alan Metter

Rodney Dangerfield can’t get no respect as a father whose son has decided that he doesn’t want to go to college. Determined to show him the importance of education, Dangerfield enrolls at the university as well. He’s instantly popular due to his wild parties, but literature professor Sally Kellerman inspires him to crack the books. There are lots of laughs, of course, as well as a cameo by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. and a soundtrack by former Oingo Boingo frontman Danny Elfman.


SLAP SHOT
1977, Universal, 122 min, USA, Dir: George Roy Hill

Director George Roy Hill (BUTCH CASSIDY AND THE SUNDANCE KID) and writer Nancy Dowd (Best Screenplay winner for COMING HOME) bring to the screen this incredibly funny and foul-mouthed saga of a has-been hockey team from a dying-on-the-vine Pennsylvania town. Paul Newman is both the team’s coach and a player who strives for a winning strategy. When an atypical fit of violence erupts in the rink, it creates a surprising spike in the team’s popularity, and Newman suddenly has a guaranteed approach to bring in the fans. Co-starring Michael Ontkean as a fish-out-of-water Ivy League player disgruntled by the bad sportsmanship, Strother Martin as the team’s manager, Jerry Houser as Dave “Killer” Carlson and Jennifer Warren as Newman’s long-suffering beautician wife. Reportedly Newman’s favorite of his films. "Easily the greatest hockey film ever made. …Paul Newman stars as the coach/player for a second-rate team who can't win and can't even get arrested until they hire three brothers with Coke-bottle glasses named the Hansons. These three violent goons begin beating other players to a pulp in every game, not only drawing attention to the team but beginning a winning streak. …Irreverent and very funny." - Jeffrey M. Anderson, combustiblecelluloid.com


Syndicate content