THE HIGH NOTE
2020, Focus Features, 153 min, USA, Dir: Nisha Ganatra

Set in the dazzling world of the L.A. music scene comes the story of Grace Davis (Tracee Ellis Ross), a superstar whose talent, and ego, have reached unbelievable heights, and Maggie (Dakota Johnson), her overworked personal assistant. While stuck running errands, Maggie still aspires to her childhood dream of becoming a music producer. When Grace’s manager (Ice Cube) presents her with a choice that could alter the course of her career, Maggie and Grace come up with a plan that could change their lives forever.


THE GREY FOX
1982, Kino Lorber, 110 min, Canada, Dir: Phillip Borsos

Released from prison in 1901 after a 33-year sentence, stagecoach robber Bill Miner (Richard Farnsworth, in a breakthrough performance) has no idea what to do with himself - until he sees THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY in a movie theater. Suitably inspired, Miner heads for British Columbia to resume his trade but when he meets forward-thinking photographer Katherine Flynn (Jackie Burroughs), the "Gentleman Bandit" is tempted to settle down. Based on a true story, this elegiac Western looks and sounds magnificent thanks to cinematographer Frank Tidy and the music of The Chieftains and composer Michael Conway Baker. "Fits beautifully between MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER and UNFORGIVEN, each of them stories about characters coming to term with changing times. There are even echoes of THE IRISHMAN, and the newly-refreshed film is ripe for reconsideration." - Jason Gorber, Slashfilm


THOUSAND PIECES OF GOLD
1990, Kino Lorber, 105 min, USA/UK, Dir: Nancy Kelly

Set in a mining town in the 1880s, THOUSAND PIECES OF GOLD is based on the classic novel by Ruthanne Lum McCunn with a screenplay by award-winning filmmaker Anne Makepeace (TRIBAL JUSTICE). The acclaimed drama tells the real-life story of Lalu (Rosalind Chao), a young Chinese woman whose desperately poor parents sell her into slavery; she is soon trafficked to a nefarious saloonkeeper in Idaho's gold country. Eventually Charlie (Chris Cooper), a different kind of man, wins her in a poker game and slowly gains her trust. Way ahead of its time, the film resonates even more powerfully today in the era of #MeToo. “A genuine triumph … This is classic Western filmmaking: the lucid lyricism of a John Ford, a Budd Boetticher, a George Stevens. But, since Kelly is dealing with different kinds of conflicts, the film always seems to be opening up a new world … Independent in the best sense of the word.” - Michael Wilmington, Los Angeles Times


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