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BELLE DE JOUR
1967, Janus Films, 101 min, France, Dir: Luis Buñuel

Housewife and glacial beauty Séverine (Catherine Deneuve), frigid at home with her doctor husband, indulges in private erotic fantasies that range from sadomasochistic to scatological. To realize her innermost sexual proclivities, Séverine becomes a prostitute at a local brothel, working only on weekday afternoons and taking on the moniker Belle de Jour. Forty-five years after its initial release, Luis Buñuel’s subversive mega-classic is as boundary-pushing as ever, its deft mix of edge and lightness underscored by Deneuve’s nimbly cool performance. In French with English subtitles.


L’AGE D’OR
1930, Kino International, 60 min, France, Dir: Luis Buñuel

Wonderfully bizarre and spun together with the allusive dictates of dream logic, the second collaboration between Luis Buñuel and Salvador Dalí is a series of gleefully irreverent vignettes, the most sustained of which centers on Gaston Modot and Lya Lys, lovers attempting to consummate their passion but continuously stalled by some of Buñuel’s favorite fixations - the church and the bourgeoisie! Featuring an infamous sequence in which Lys fellates the toe of a religious statue, L’AGE D’OR was banned from distribution for nearly 50 years after its initial release in 1930. With Surrealism co-founder Max Ernst. In French with English subtitles.


THE DEVILS
1971, Warner Bros., 108 min, UK, Dir: Ken Russell

Director Ken Russell’s adaptation of Aldous Huxley’s The Devils of Loudun remains one of the most disturbingly memorable films of the early 1970s. In 17th-century France, Cardinal Richelieu’s minions use the womanizing of activist priest Urban Grandier (Oliver Reed) as an excuse to investigate his "diabolic possession" of the local nuns, including the demented, hunchbacked Mother Superior Sister Jeanne (an unforgettable Vanessa Redgrave).


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