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MURDER À LA MOD
1968, DistribPix, 80 min, USA, Dir: Brian De Palma

Rarely seen after its initial release in a single New York theater, Brian De Palma’s feature debut is a stylish murder mystery set in the adult-film business in 1960s New York City. Exhibiting many of the same styles and thematic preoccupations that the auteur would soon be famous for, the film is a thrilling homage to great genre films before it, equal parts Powell’s PEEPING TOM, Kubrick’s THE KILLING and Hitchcock’s PSYCHO. The story begins when seedy filmmaker Christopher (Jared Martin) tries to trick his girlfriend, aspiring actress Karen (Margo Norton), into starring in one of his partner’s skin flicks. Obstructing his plans is the bizarre prankster Otto (William Finley), who stalks the building where they’re shooting. In Hitchcockian fashion, Christopher’s luck runs out when a series of seemingly unconnected events leads to a shocking murder scene.


THE BEAST MUST DIE
LA BESTIA DEBE MORIR
1952, 95 min, Argentina, Dir: Román Viñoly Barreto

“I am going to kill a man. I don’t know his name, I don’t know where he lives, I have no idea what he looks like. But I am going to find him and kill him …” A mystery writer adopts a new identity to track down the hit-and-run driver who killed his son. Based on Nicholas Blake’s landmark 1938 novel of psychological suspense, this superb film has been gorgeously restored.


GIRL WITH HYACINTHS
FLICKA OCH HYACINTER
1950, Telepicture Marketing, 89 min, Sweden, Dir: Hasse Ekman

When beautiful young Dagmar Brink (Eva Henning) commits suicide her neighbors are stunned - especially when her final note leaves them all her possessions, including the enigmatic portrait of Dagmar called “Girl with Hyacinths.” Intrigued, the husband begins an investigation into what could have made the beguiling woman kill herself. Ekman’s greatest film is a slow-building tale of suspense leading to a stunning, unforgettable conclusion. “An absolute masterpiece. Twenty-four carats. Perfect.” - Ingmar Bergman.


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