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DAY OF THE DEAD
1985, Taurus Entertainment, 96 min, USA, Dir: George A. Romero

In the third installment of George A. Romero’s living-dead saga, the zombies have firmly taken control of the world. Holed up in an underground bunker in Florida, a group of scientists and military men search for a solution to the undead outbreak. But the testing of zombie specimens by Logan (Richard Liberty) causes friction with Rhodes (Joe Pilato, in a tour de force performance), and some of the group, including Sarah (Lori Cardille), begin to think it might be safer outside with the flesh-eaters. Featuring state-of-the-art special effects by Tom Savini and an Academy Award-caliber performance by Howard Sherman as Bub (the zombie with a soul), Romero’s film viciously pulls the guts out of Reagan-era America to show the bloody mess it’s become.


THE BLACK VAMPIRE
EL VAMPIRO NEGRO
1953, Argentina Sono Film, 104 min, Argentina, Dir: Román Viñoly Barreto

In this stunning reimagining of Fritz Lang’s classic M rediscovered by the Film Noir Foundation, Olga Zubarry, Argentina’s answer to Marilyn Monroe, plays a chanteuse and single mother who is the sole eyewitness to the child killer stalking the streets of Buenos Aires. Will her daughter be the next victim? Featuring stunning cinematography by Aníbal González Paz. A major cinema discovery!


THE CAT O’NINE TAILS
IL GATTO A NOVE CODE
1971, AGFA, 112 min, Italy/France/West Germany, Dir: Dario Argento

This second entry in Dario Argento’s “Animal Trilogy” found the young talent further refining his distinctive style and cementing his reputation as master of the giallo. When a break-in occurs at a secretive genetics institute, a blind puzzle-maker (Karl Malden) overhears an attempt to blackmail an institute scientist shortly before the robbery; he teams up with intrepid reporter Carlo (James Franciscus) to crack the case. Soon the bodies pile up, and the two amateur sleuths find their own lives at risk. Worse still, the puzzle-maker’s niece (Cinzia De Carolis) is in the killer’s sights. Featuring another nerve-jangling score by the great Ennio Morricone, THE CAT O’ NINE TAILS remains one of Argento’s most suspenseful and underrated films.


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