KAGEMUSHA
1980, 20th Century Fox, 179 min, Japan/USA, Dir: Akira Kurosawa

In 16th-century Japan, Lord Shingen Takeda is killed by an enemy sharp-shooter and a condemned thief (Tatsuya Nakadai) who looks uncannily like Takeda must take the ruler’s place. Shakespearean in scope, Akira Kurosawa's epic period drama won the Palme d'Or at the 1980 Cannes Film Festival.


BUDAPEST NOIR
2017, Menemsha Films, 95 min, Dir: Éva Gárdos

Budapest, 1936. The Hungarian prime minister returns from Nazi Germany in a coffin, his dream of making Hungary into a fascist state snuffed out - for now. Meanwhile crime reporter Zsigmond Gordon (Krisztián Kolovratnik), a cynic who thinks he has seen it all, stumbles upon an unusual killing in a seedy part of the city, the victim being a young woman with only a Jewish prayer book in her purse. An official stonewall blocks his investigation, provoking Gordon to solve the puzzle of her demise. With the help of Krisztina (Reka Tenki), a beautiful photographer who once broke his heart, Gordon pursues his own investigation into Budapest's dark underbelly - a world of pornography, boxers, brothels and Communist cells - all the way to the highest echelons of power.


DAUGHTERS OF THE DUST
1991, Cohen Media, 112 min, UK/USA, Dir: Julie Dash

At the dawn of the 20th century, a multigenerational family in the Gullah community on the Sea Islands off of South Carolina - former West African slaves who adopted many of their ancestors’ Yoruba traditions - struggle to maintain their cultural heritage and folklore while contemplating a migration to the mainland, even further from their roots. This landmark film was the first wide release by a black female filmmaker, and has been named to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry. “In the hands of director Julie Dash and photographer Arthur Jafa, this nonlinear film becomes visual poetry, a wedding of imagery and rhythm that connects oral tradition with the music video. It is an astonishing, vivid portrait not only of a time and place but of an era’s spirit.” - Rita Kempley, The Washington Post.


Syndicate content