We’re thrilled to announce a complete re-design of the American Cinematheque website. See The New Site Now >
YOUNG MR. LINCOLN
1939, 20th Century Fox, 100 min, USA, Dir: John Ford

Director John Ford and actor Henry Fonda’s first collaboration produced this poignant, fascinating chronicle of Abraham Lincoln’s early life. The emphasis is on the simple joys and hardships that shaped the president-to-be’s youthful years, events that molded a shy country lawyer into one of the most distinguished of American leaders. We follow Lincoln as he clerks in a general store, studies law from second-hand books and endures heartbreak as his first love, Ann Rutledge (Pauline Moore), dies a tragic, premature death. Ford culminates his story as savvy Lincoln skillfully defends two brothers (Richard Cromwell, Eddie Quillan) wrongfully accused of murder. Marjorie Weaver plays future first lady Mary Todd. With Alice Brady, Donald Meek and Ward Bond.


MY DARLING CLEMENTINE
1946, 20th Century Fox, 97 min, USA, Dir: John Ford

John Ford directs one of the most beautiful, melancholic, lyrical Westerns ever made, painting an atmospheric interpretation of Wyatt Earp (Henry Fonda), the Earp siblings (Ward Bond, Tim Holt), Doc Holliday (Victor Mature) and their escalating feud with the cattle-rustling Clanton family (Walter Brennan, John Ireland and Grant Withers). Although Ford hews closer to the legend than to the cold hard facts (especially with the fictionalized female characters, Cathy Downs as Clementine and Linda Darnell as Chihuahua), that is, in large part, the point of the film - an elegiac vision of a heroic age when almost-mythological personalities walked the earth as real, flesh-and-blood people. Poignant, exhilarating and gorgeous from beginning to end.


MY DINNER WITH ANDRÉ
1981, Janus Films, 110 min, USA, Dir: Louis Malle

In this captivating and philosophical film, actor and playwright Wallace Shawn sits down with theater director friend André Gregory at a restaurant on New York’s Upper West Side, and the pair proceed through an alternately whimsical and despairing confessional about love, death, money and all the superstition in between. Playing variations on their own New York–honed personas, Shawn and Gregory, who also cowrote the screenplay, dive in with introspective intellectual gusto, and Malle captures it all with a delicate, artful detachment. A fascinating freeze-frame of cosmopolitan culture, MY DINNER WITH ANDRÉ remains a unique work in cinema history.


Syndicate content