We’re thrilled to announce a complete re-design of the American Cinematheque website. See The New Site Now >
DEATH RACE 2000
1975, New World Pictures, 80 min, USA, Dir: Paul Bartel

In the year 2000, hit-and-run driving is no longer a felony - it's the national sport! In a dystopian future, economic collapse has pushed America into martial law; to keep the people pacified, the government has created the Transcontinental Road Race. Pro-wrestling-style drivers (David Carradine, Mary Woronov and a pre-ROCKY Sylvester Stallone among them) resort to any violence necessary to cross the finish line first, racking up bonus points for killing pedestrians. But resistance fighters hope to use the race to their own ends in Paul Bartel’s satirical cult favorite.


MELVIN AND HOWARD
1980, Universal, 95 min, USA, Dir: Jonathan Demme

Years after Melvin Dummar (Paul Le Mat) rescues a bedraggled old man (Jason Robards) stranded in the Nevada desert, his kindness is rewarded when he is named a beneficiary in Howard Hughes’ “Mormon Will” in this acclaimed film based on a possibly true story. A spot-on portrait of blue-collar American dreamers, MELVIN AND HOWARD earned Oscars for its original screenplay and for Mary Steenburgen’s beguiling performance as Dummar’s wife. “This lyrical comedy, directed by Jonathan Demme, from a script by Bo Goldman, is an almost flawless act of sympathetic imagination. … This picture has the same beautiful dippy warmth as its characters; it's what might have happened if Jean Renoir had directed a comedy script by Preston Sturges.” – Pauline Kael.


PHILADELPHIA
1993, Sony Repertory, 125 min, USA, Dir: Jonathan Demme

In one of the first mainstream Hollywood films to deal with AIDS, Tom Hanks stars as a young attorney suffering from the disease who must retain a small-time lawyer (Denzel Washington) to lead a wrongful termination suit against his former employer. This acclaimed drama costars Jason Robards, Mary Steenburgen, Antonio Banderas and Joanne Woodward, and earned Oscars for Hanks' moving performance and Bruce Springsteen's original song "Streets of Philadelphia."


Syndicate content