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LOLO
2015, FilmRise, 99 min, France, Dir: Julie Delpy

Don’t expect a traditional rom-com from writer-director Julie Delpy, who stars here as Violette, a Parisian fashion editor who falls for IT engineer Jean-Rene (famed French funnyman Dany Boon) while on holiday. The relationship has a major hurdle to surmount in Violette’s 19-year-old son, Lolo (Vincent Lacoste), who resorts to increasingly underhanded measures to keep his mother’s affections for himself. “Julie Delpy’s most winningly mainstream concoction yet.” - Boyd van Hoeij, The Hollywood Reporter. In French and English with English subtitles.


RED (1994)
TROIS COULEURS: ROUGE
1994, Janus Films, 98 min, France, Poland, Switzerland, Dir: Krzysztof Kieślowski

In the trilogy’s final installment, Swiss model Valentine (played by Irène Jacob, from THE DOUBLE LIFE OF VERONIQUE) meets an embittered former judge (Jean-Louis Trintignant) who spies on his neighbors, and crosses paths with an intriguing young law student (Jean-Pierre Lorit). In a wonderful piece of cosmic stage-managing, Kieślowski brings together the main characters from all the THREE COLORS stories during a storm-tossed ferry ride. In French with English subtitles.


WHITE
TROIS COULEURS: BLANC
1994, Janus Films, 91 min, France, Poland, Switzerland, Dir: Krzysztof Kieślowski

The second film in director Krzysztof Kieślowski’s THREE COLORS trilogy is the simplest and most entertaining entry in the cycle, yet underneath the comedic surface lie some of the director’s most cynical attitudes. A luminous Julie Delpy plays Dominique, who leaves her impotent husband, sparking a series of skirmishes between the two in which Kieślowski expresses his theme of "equality" via its darkest implications - in terms of revenge and getting even. The film is both a deliciously biting sex satire and a witty portrait of Poland in the early 1990s; in contextualizing his characters within the failure of communism, Kieślowski argues that true equality is an unattainable pipe dream. In Polish, French, and Russian with English subtitles.


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