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WOMEN MAKE FILM: A NEW ROAD MOVIE THROUGH CINEMA
2018, Turner Classic Movies, 60 min, UK, Dir: Mark Cousins

Most films have been directed by men, but for thirteen decades, and on all six filmmaking continents, thousands of women have also been directing films - including some of the best. What techniques did they use? What can we learn about cinema from them? This 14-part documentary explores how films are made, shot and edited; how stories are shaped and how movies depict life, love, politics, humor and death, all through the compelling lens of some of the world’s greatest directors - all of them women. "An invaluable film appreciation workshop ... it’s exciting to encounter so much originality from filmmakers I didn’t know, and to realize just how much of the world of cinema remains for me to discover." - Peter Debruge, Variety.


F.T.A.
1972, 96 min, USA, Dir: Francine Parker

Produced by Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland, F.T.A. is a witty and moving film that chronicles opposition to the Vietnam War. Fonda and Sutherland, along with Holly Near, Michael Alaimo, Rita Martinson and Len Chandler, entertained American troops with a satirical revue called (in the polite version) “Free the Army.” The original theatrical release was curtailed under somewhat mysterious circumstances so the film was never widely seen and reemerges now as an essential piece of cinema and social history.


THE CHINA SYNDROME
1979, Sony Repertory, 122 min, USA, Dir: James Bridges

The title of this riveting thriller refers to the possibility that a malfunction at a nuclear power plant could cause radioactive material to melt through the floor, “all the way to China.” Bright and ambitious TV reporter Jane Fonda is on assignment with her cameraman Michael Douglas at a Southern California power plant when she learns of an impending control-room crisis involving plant supervisor Jack Lemmon. While the nuclear power industry greeted the film’s premiere with howls of protest, the Three Mile Island accident that followed less than two weeks later gave it a chilling credibility.


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