RIDICULE
1996, Park Circus/Miramax, 102 min, France, Dir: Patrice Leconte

Moved by the difficulties faced by peasants living in the mosquito-ridden swamplands near Lyon, aristocratic engineer Marquis Grégoire Ponceludon de Malavoy (Charles Berling) devises a plan to drain the boggy land. But to gain an audience with King Louis XVI (Urbain Cancelier) in Versailles, he learns he must impress the royal court with his verbal wit. Drawn into a world of ever-shifting alliances where words are used as weapons, the marquis begins to lose sight of his noble intentions.


8 WOMEN
8 FEMMES
2002, Focus Features, 111 min, France/Italy, Dir: François Ozon

For 8 WOMEN, director François Ozon convened a company of France’s finest female acting talents. Danielle Darrieux is Mamy, the wheelchair-bound matriarch of a wealthy family that gathers at its chalet for Christmas, only to find the master of the house dead from a knife to the back. Catherine Deneuve and Isabelle Huppert are Mamy’s daughters, who, along with each of the film’s other principal characters, find themselves trapped in the chalet and accused of murder. Adapted from Robert Thomas’ stage play and influenced by the screwball comedies of old Hollywood, 8 WOMEN marries farce, melodrama and musical in an unbridled exploration of just how quickly the gloves come off when eight women with lethal motives are confined together.


CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS
VIVEMENT DIMANCHE!
1983, Janus Films, 110 min, Dir: François Truffaut

In François Truffaut’s delightfully entertaining tribute to Hitchcock, a businessman (Jean-Louis Trintingnant) is wrongly accused of murder, and while he goes on the lam his secretary (Fanny Ardant) tries to find the real killer. Gorgeous black-and-white photography by Nestor Almendros and a witty screenplay (by Truffaut and frequent collaborators Suzanne Schiffman and Jean Aurel, adapting hardboiled American writer Charles Williams’ The Long Saturday Night) make this one of the director’s most enjoyable efforts.


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