HARD TIMES
1975, Sony Repertory, 93 min, USA, Dir: Walter Hill

Walter Hill’s debut feature as director is this no-holds-barred tale of a bare-knuckle boxer (Charles Bronson) in Depression-era New Orleans and the fast-talking promoter (James Coburn) who parlays Bronson’s talents as a pugilist into quick money. “There's the temptation, with material like this, to fashion parables and give the characters portentous speeches about the meaning of it all. But HARD TIMES never steps back from itself, never lectures us. Its theme is buried in its material, and it's a hard-edged action film all the way.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.


STREETS OF FIRE
1984, Universal, 94 min, USA, Dir: Walter Hill

One of the great guilty pleasures of the 1980s, director Walter Hill’s spectacular, rock & roll-fueled pulp classic roars at you like a souped-up roadster with the radio going full blast. B-movie god Michael Paré stars as an enigmatic loner who comes back to town to save former gal-pal Diane Lane from the clutches of sinister biker chieftain Willem Dafoe (sporting one of the wickedest hair-dos known to mankind.) Outtasight, baby!


THE WARRIORS
1979, Paramount, 93 min, USA, Dir: Walter Hill

One of director Walter Hill’s finest films assumes a dark, comic book style, following the Coney Island Warriors as they run for their lives after being fingered for the murder of a peacemaking gang leader. The gangbangers brave a gauntlet of ghetto booby traps, unseen marauders, unsympathetic cops and rabid, teen NYC wolfpacks as they try to reach safe home turf. Tough-talking Michael Beck, James Remar and Deborah Van Valkenburgh lead a snarling young cast.


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