WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR
1967, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Martin Scorsese took the filmmaking world by storm at the 1967 Chicago International Film Festival with this New York City-set drama that is steeped in cinema history while forging ahead towards something new. Shrouded in the fog of Catholic guilt which so informs his later films, WHO’S THAT KNOCKING AT MY DOOR is a haunting story of a young couples’ reckoning with a traumatizing event. Featuring the acting debut of Harvey Keitel, along with a memorable performance by Zina Bethune, the film, as critic Roger Ebert observed upon its premiere, was “absolutely genuine” and “a great moment in American movies.”


THE AGE OF INNOCENCE
1993, Sony Repertory, 139 min, USA, Dir: Martin Scorsese

Director Martin Scorsese visits New York City’s Gilded Age in this rich adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel. Upper class lawyer Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is engaged to marry May Welland (Winona Ryder) when May’s cousin, the Countess Ellen Olenska (Michelle Pfeiffer), arrives from Europe. While the Countess’ desire to leave her husband invites gossip, Archer’s growing attraction to this free-thinking woman could prove even more ruinous. Meticulously crafted in every regard, from Joanne Woodward’s narration to Gabriella Pescucci’s Oscar-winning costume design, this is among Scorsese’s most underrated films.


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