THE SCARLET HOUR
1956, Paramount, 95 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

Nearing the end of his legendary career, Michael Curtiz produced and directed this intricately plotted L.A.-based crime thriller headed by a cast of new discoveries. A tony seductress (Carol Ohmart) and her lover (Tom Tryon) overhear plans for a jewel robbery, and believe the scheme will be their deliverance from Ohmart’s possessive husband (James Gregory). Highlights include a guest appearance by Nat King Cole singing “Never Let Me Go” in the Crystal Room of the Beverly Hills Hotel. Culled from the Paramount vault, this 35mm print remains one of the least seen film noirs of the 1950s, featuring Curtiz’s use of the then-new Fujinon camera lens. You’ll only see this at NOIR CITY!


ARTISTS AND MODELS
1955, Paramount, 109 min, Dir: Frank Tashlin

Former Looney Tunes director Frank Tashlin was the perfect choice to helm this wacky tale about comic books and their creators. In one of the last and best films of their highly successful partnership, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis play an aspiring artist and his comics-obsessed roommate; Dorothy Malone and Shirley MacLaine (in her second feature) provide romantic interest. Along with prime Lewis slapstick, Dino gets to croon some wonderful songs by Harry Warren and Jack Brooks.


THE FULLER BRUSH MAN
1948, Sony Repertory, 93 min, USA, Dir: S. Sylvan Simon

In what’s often cited as his best feature, funnyman Red Skelton plays a man struggling to hold down a job until his sweetheart (Janet Blair) pulls some strings for him at the Fuller Brush Company. Red proves surprisingly effective as a door-to-door salesman - until he’s mistaken for a murderer when a customer turns up dead. The slapstick and one-liners fly fast and furious in this film, co-written by the great Frank Tashlin.


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