THE FORTUNE
1975, Sony Repertory, 88 min, USA, Dir: Mike Nichols

Sexier than the Marx Bros., handsomer than Laurel and Hardy but not as smart as the Three Stooges, hapless 1920s con men Warren Beatty and Jack Nicholson see big money in the person of sanitary-napkin heiress Stockard Channing, and they’re willing to stoop to marriage and murder to get it. With its offbeat characters and occasionally dark tone, this underrated gem is a favorite of Joel and Ethan Coen. “Manically scatterbrained … farce of a rare order.” - Vincent Canby, The New York Times.


MODEL SHOP
1969, Sony Repertory, 95 min, USA/France, Dir: Jacques Demy

Gary Lockwood stars as a young American who falls in love with French model Anouk Aimée, in Jacques Demy's only Hollywood studio feature (it was financed by Columbia). Aimée reprises her role as the titular character of Demy's first film, LOLA, but neither she nor Lockwood is the real star of MODEL SHOP: That honor goes to the city of Los Angeles itself, which Demy photographs with the same blend of wonder and authenticity that characterizes his French films. This is no idealized version of Hollywood - it's an L.A. of supermarkets and parking lots - yet Demy's romantic eye lends a style and dignity to even the most mundane people and locations. In English.


FIVE EASY PIECES
1970, Sony Repertory, 96 min, USA, Dir: Bob Rafelson

Hard-hitting, brilliantly sarcastic drama of Bakersfield oil rig worker Jack Nicholson on the run from his former life as a concert pianist (!), with country waitress girlfriend (and Tammy Wynette fan) Karen Black in tow. Returning to visit his Washington island home after his father has a stroke, things come to a head when he seduces the fiancee (Susan Anspach) of his better-than-thou brother (Ralph Waite). One of the defining films of the New Hollywood, stunningly directed by Bob Rafelson and written by Carole Eastman (under the name Adrien Joyce). Co-starring the great Billy Green Bush as Nicholson’s hapless, redneck friend and Fannie Flagg as Bush’s loyal spouse. "…a masterpiece of heartbreaking intensity." - Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times


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