ONE-EYED JACKS
1961, Universal, 141 min, USA, Dir: Marlon Brando

Originally intended as a project for director Stanley Kubrick (based on various scripts by Sam Peckinpah and Rod Serling, among others), ONE-EYED JACKS became (in)famous as the only film directed by Marlon Brando – who also stars as an outlaw bent on taking revenge on former friend Karl Malden. A surreal and often stunning film that anticipated postmodern Westerns like Monte Hellman’s THE SHOOTING and Peckinpah’s own THE BALLAD OF CABLE HOGUE.


RAMBLING ROSE
1991, Rialto Pictures, 112 min, USA, Dir: Martha Coolidge

Martha Coolidge’s compassionate Depression-era drama, adapted by Calder Willingham from his 1972 novel, stars Laura Dern in the title role as a young woman fleeing a disreputable past. She winds up at the doorstep of the Hillyers (Robert Duvall and Diane Ladd), who agree to take her in – but Rose’s flirtatious presence ultimately proves unsettling. Anchored by four outstanding performances (including Lukas Haas as smitten Buddy Hillyer), the film brought Oscar nominations to both Ladd and Dern, the first time a real-life mother and daughter had been so honored.


THIEVES LIKE US
1974, Park Circus/MGM, 123 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Based on the same source novel as Nicholas Ray’s THEY LIVE BY NIGHT, this affecting film stars Keith Carradine, John Schuck and Bert Remsen as escaped convicts who become desperado bank robbers in 1930 Mississippi. When the trio hole up in a gas station, one of them falls for the owner’s daughter (Shelley Duvall). With Tom Skerritt and Louise Fletcher. “Robert Altman finds a sure, soft tone in this movie and never loses it. His account of Coca-Cola-swigging young lovers in the ’30s is the most quietly poetic of his films; it's sensuous right from the first pearly-green long shot, and it seems to achieve beauty without artifice.” - Pauline Kael.


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