THE WAR OF THE WORLDS
1953, Paramount, 85 min, USA, Dir: Byron Haskin

Gene Barry and Ann Robinson battle invading Martian war machines in this still amazingly visceral, comic book-style feast of apocalyptic images – one of the defining sci-fi films of the 1950s. Produced by George Pal, based on the classic novel by H.G. Wells.


THE LODGER (1944)
1944, 20th Century Fox, 84 min, USA, Dir: John Brahm

The foggy, gas-lit London environs of Jack the Ripper are memorably recreated by director John Brahm and cinematographer Lucien Ballard with a stellar ensemble of 1940s British-Hollywood performers including Merle Oberon, George Sanders and Sir Cedric Hardwicke. Front and center is the mountainously sinister Laird Cregar, whose chilling performance garnered him a tragically brief period of movie stardom. Don’t miss the definitive screen version of Marie Belloc Lowndes’ novel about the infamous Ripper murders on the big screen!


NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES
1948, Universal, 81 min, USA, Dir: John Farrow

Edward G. Robinson gives a doom-laden performance as a bogus carnival mentalist who suddenly becomes cursed with the ability to actually see into the future - and he sees a dreadful fate for his best friend's daughter. A flower crushed underfoot, a sudden wind, a clock striking 11, the paw of a lion ... what does it all mean? Director John Farrow, always at his most stylish in noir terrain, adapts from the novel by master of suspense Cornell Woolrich (REAR WINDOW). Costarring Gail Russell and John Lund, with darkly evocative camerawork by John F. Seitz.


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