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A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN
1992, Sony Repertory, 128 min, USA, Dir: Penny Marshall

“There’s no crying in baseball!” Professional sports were pitched a curveball by WWII, when many players were pulled from the field for military duty; the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League was created to fill the void. Penny Marshall’s affectionate look back at the game and the women of the Rockford Peaches stars Geena Davis, Rosie O’Donnell, Lori Petty and Madonna, with Tom Hanks as the team’s initially skeptical manager. Named to the United States National Film Registry in 2012. “Though big of budget, A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN is one of the year’s most cheerful, most relaxed, most easily enjoyable comedies. It’s a serious film that’s lighter than air, a very funny movie that manages to score a few points for feminism in passing.” - Vincent Canby, New York Times


ANOTHER WOMAN
1988, Park Circus/MGM, 81 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

With noisy construction going on where she lives, philosophy professor Marion Post (Gena Rowlands) rents a room in another building to complete her new book in peace. But now she’s next to a therapist’s office and can overhear the patients - among them an expectant mother (Mia Farrow) whose problems strike an unexpected chord with Marion. The top-flight supporting cast includes Gene Hackman, Blythe Danner, Ian Holm and, in his final film, John Houseman. This Bergman-esque drama (shot by Sven Nykvist) is among Allen’s most absorbing.


ZELIG
1983, Park Circus/MGM, 79 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

Woody Allen directs and stars as 1920s human chameleon Leonard Zelig, whose uncanny ability to mimic others brings him fame and the attentions of psychiatrist Eudora Fletcher (Mia Farrow). This mockumentary makes clever use of contemporary interviews (from such commentators as Susan Sontag and Saul Bellow) and vintage newsreel footage, tweaked to show Zelig interacting with historical figures such as Babe Ruth, Charles Lindbergh and Adolf Hitler. Santo Loquasto’s costume design and Gordon Willis’s cinematography both earned Oscar nominations. “ZELIG is not only pricelessly funny, it's also, on occasion, very moving. It works simultaneously as social history, as a love story, as an examination of several different kinds of film narrative, as satire and as parody.” - Vincent Canby, The New York Times.


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