POPEYE
1980, Paramount, 114 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Few actors could bring a cartoon character to life the way Robin Williams does in his first major film role as the titular sailor man in director Robert Altman’s musical comedy (though Shelley Duvall is pretty well cast herself as rail-thin love interest Olive Oyl). Bluto, Wimpy, Swee'Pea and all your favorites are here, as Popeye searches for his father and discovers the power of spinach. While not the blockbuster it was expected to be, the film was a financial success, and its cult reputation has risen through the years, thanks in part to its Jules Feiffer-penned screenplay and Harry Nilsson’s music.


MARATHON MAN
1976, Paramount, 125 min, USA, Dir: John Schlesinger

Nail-biting political thriller with Dustin Hoffman investigating the death of his government agent brother, Roy Scheider - and running smack into Nazi-on-the-run Laurence Olivier, in one of his most wildly entertaining performances. Marthe Keller earned a Golden Globe nomination for her role as Hoffman’s ill-fated girlfriend.


THE TWO JAKES
1990, Paramount, 137 min, USA, Dir: Jack Nicholson

The follow-up to one of the most acclaimed films of the 1970s, THE TWO JAKES picks up a decade after CHINATOWN ended, with private eye Jake Gittes (Jack Nicholson) still shadowing unfaithful spouses. At least that’s how the job starts out when Julius “Jake” Berman (Harvey Keitel) hires him. In the sting operation to catch the guy his wife is cheating with, Berman ends up shooting the man – who just happens to be his business partner. Now Gittes must figure out if the shots were fired in rage or if he’s been deliberately set up as an accomplice to murder. From the same producer (Robert Evans) and screenwriter (Robert Towne) as the original, THE TWO JAKES digs into the dirt of Southern California’s oil industry much like CHINATOWN dug into the secrets of Los Angeles’ water table.


Syndicate content