DEATH WISH 3
1985, Park Circus/MGM, 92 min, USA/Canada, Dir: Michael Winner

Charles Bronson reprises his role as Paul Kersey for a third time in one of the most over-the-top and gratuitously violent films ever committed to celluloid. Returning to New York (actually England pretending to be New York), Kersey discovers things are even worse than before when a crooked police chief (Ed Lauter) forcibly recruits the architect-vigilante to clean up the streets. With a 50-plus body count, non-stop action and Bronson's deadpan delivery, director Michael Winner pushed DEATH WISH 3 to absurd and excessive extremes; it remains one of the crown jewels of Golan and Globus’ Cannon Group empire.


THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1989)
1989, Park Circus/MGM, 95 min, USA/UK/Hungary, Dir: Dwight H. Little

“Only love and music are forever.” NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET star Robert Englund dons the phantom’s mask for a big-screen adaptation of the famed Gaston Leroux novel that hews closer to the horror of the original than the romance of the Andrew Lloyd Webber musical. An accident during an audition transports 1980s Juilliard student Christine Day (Jill Schoelen) back to 19th-century London, where a horribly disfigured antihero who haunts an aging opera house becomes infatuated with her. With Alex Hyde-White, Bill Nighy and Molly Shannon (in her film debut).


10 TO MIDNIGHT
1983, Park Circus/MGM, 101 min, USA, Dir: J. Lee Thompson

“Forget what's legal and do what's right.” A Golan and Globus production that doesn't skimp on nudity or violence, this riveting police thriller showcases Charles Bronson at his vigilante best. He stars as Leo Kessler, a tough L.A. cop whose daughter is stalked by a cunning sex-killer (Gene Davis); the first-rate cast includes Wilford Brimley and Geoffrey Lewis.


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