EIGHT HOURS OF TERROR
HACHIJIKAN NO KYŌFU
1957, AGFA, 78 min, Japan, Dir: Seijun Suzuki

After a typhoon stops a train on its track, the passengers are forced to take a bus through the countryside. To make matters worse, some escaped criminals try to hijack the bus. EIGHT HOURS OF TERROR is Suzuki's riff on one of his favorite films, John Ford's STAGECOACH, as well as one of his best early thrillers. Text courtesy of Doc Films.


EVERYTHING GOES WRONG
SUBETE GA KURUTTERU
1960, Janus Films, 72 min, Japan, Dir: Seijun Suzuki

With its dynamic camerawork and deftly intercut storylines, this little-known gem from director Seijun Suzuki blends the energy of the pulpiest juvenile-delinquent flicks with the angst of REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE. Disillusioned by his mother, Jirô (Tamio Kawaji) takes to the streets with friends, their petty crimes gradually escalating to a devastating climax. Yoshiko Nezu is mesmerizing as the girl smitten with the wayward Jirô.


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