FOOLISH WIVES
1922, 142 min, USA, Dir: Erich Von Stroheim

Billed by Universal as the "first million-dollar movie," Erich Von Stroheim's monumental FOOLISH WIVES was the most expensive film to have been made at the time, and one of the most controversial. Von Stroheim, billed as "The Man You Love to Hate," stars as the impostor who calls himself “Count Karamzin” in order to seduce and exploit aristocratic women. Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 2008.


THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME
1923, Universal, 133 min, USA, Dir: Wallace Worsley

Universal 's 1923 super-production was the first big-screen adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic novel. Lon Chaney stars as Quasimodo, the bell ringer of Notre Dame, who falls in love with gypsy girl Esmeralda (Patsy Ruth Miller) in 15th century Paris.


THE BIG PARADE
1925, Warner Bros., 151 min, USA, Dir: King Vidor

King Vidor’s 1925 account of World War I delivers both epic sweep and intimate emotional moments in its tale of a young soldier (John Gilbert) who finds solace in the arms of a French woman (Renée Adorée) amidst the horror of war. Made just seven years after the end of the Great War, the film was the first war picture to tell its story from the point of view of a soldier. While the first half of the film is part light-hearted comedy, the second depicts war very realistically.


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