RED HEADED WOMAN
1932, Warner Bros., 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Conway

The legendary Jean Harlow delivers a star-making performance in this provocative pre-Hays Code comedy as a charming gold digger who sleeps her way to fortune. Secretary Lillian Andrews sets her sights on her boss, eventually luring him away from his happy marriage to his childhood sweetheart. But instead of making a big splash in society, she is rejected. After casting her attention on a coal king, Lillian realizes that she loves her French chauffeur (Charles Boyer). The film is often cited as one of the motion pictures that brought about more stringent censorship.


GRAND HOTEL
1932, Warner Bros., 113 min, USA, Dir: Edmund Goulding

Director Edmund Goulding orchestrates a dazzling parade of iconographic stars and intersecting subplots. Ballerina Greta Garbo, aristocrat John Barrymore, secretary Joan Crawford and cutthroat mogul Wallace Beery are just a few of the legends who make their way through this classic ensemble drama, a film whose influence can be seen in later films by Robert Altman and P.T. Anderson, among many others. Cedric Gibbons’ stunning Art Deco art direction gives the players an opulent setting for their personal melodramas.


FOOLISH WIVES
1922, 142 min, USA, Dir: Erich Von Stroheim

Billed by Universal as the "first million-dollar movie," Erich Von Stroheim's monumental FOOLISH WIVES was the most expensive film to have been made at the time, and one of the most controversial. Von Stroheim, billed as "The Man You Love to Hate," stars as the impostor who calls himself “Count Karamzin” in order to seduce and exploit aristocratic women. Selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 2008.


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