THE SEA WOLF
1941, Warner Bros.,, 100 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

The definitive cinematic version of Jack London’s famed novel returns to the big screen. Edward G. Robinson’s magnificent portrayal of Wolf Larsen is the centerpiece of a darkly fatalistic tale adapted by Robert Rossen (ALL THE KING’S MEN, THE HUSTLER) who blends a distinctive anti-Nazi sentiment (initiated into American movies by the brothers Warner) with an unforgettable saga of tyranny at sea. An all-star cast of John Garfield, Ida Lupino, Gene Lockhart and Barry Fitzgerald add dramatic heft to Curtiz’s brilliantly helmed epic.


DECEPTION
1946, Warner Bros., 115 min, Dir: Irving Rapper

Aspiring pianist Christine Radcliffe (Bette Davis) is reunited with her lover, cellist Karel Novak (Paul Henreid), whom she feared had died in a Nazi concentration camp. Unfortunately, she’s now the mistress of renowned composer Alexander Hollenius (Claude Rains), who is as creative manipulating human emotions as he is conducting an orchestra. Featuring a soaring score by the legendary Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Lovers of classical music will be swept away by the rapturous music; lovers of classic Hollywood will relish the arch tête-a-tête between Bette Davis and, at his vitriolic best, the incomparable Claude Rains.


DEEP VALLEY
1947, Warner Bros., 104 min, Dir: Jean Negulesco

A shy girl (Ida Lupino) raised on a remote coastal farm by unloving parents (Henry Hull and Fay Bainter) has her world turned upside down when she falls in love with an escaped convict (Dane Clark) being hunted by a posse. One of Lupino’s most sensitive performances is bolstered by a nuanced screenplay by Salka Viertel and assured direction by Negulesco. Also starring Wayne Morris. Filmed on location at Palos Verdes and Big Bear Lake.


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