SAFETY LAST!
1923, Janus Films, 73 min, USA, Dir: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor

The comic genius of silent star Harold Lloyd is eternal. Chaplin is the sweet innocent, Keaton the stoic outsider, but Lloyd - the modern guy striving for success - is us. And with its torrent of perfectly executed gags and astonishing stunts, SAFETY LAST! is the perfect introduction to him. Lloyd plays a small-town bumpkin trying to make it in the big city, who finds employment as a lowly department-store clerk. He comes up with a wild publicity stunt to draw attention to the store, resulting in an incredible feat of derring-do on his part that gets him started on the climb to success – a climb that results in one of the most iconic images in film history, as Lloyd dangles from a clock high above the streets of Los Angeles.


SONS OF THE DESERT
1933, 65 min, USA, Dir: William A. Seiter

To attend a convention in Chicago of their fraternal organization, the Sons of the Desert, Stan and Ollie lie to their wives - but their cover story soon falls apart. Laurel and Hardy fans adopted the name of this feature for their organization, and many would cite it as the duo’s best; it was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2012. Costarring Charley Chase.


THE DEVIL’S BROTHER
1933, Warner Bros., 90 min, USA, Dir: Hal Roach, Charley Rogers

Northern Italy was rife with bandits in the early 1700s, none more notorious than singing bandit Fra Diavolo (Dennis King), who enlists “Stanlio” Laurel and “Ollio” Hardy to help him rob a lord (James Finlayson) and romance the man’s lady (Thelma Todd). This adaptation of the Daniel Auber operetta is filled with hilarious sequences, including Stan’s "Kneesy-Earsy-Nosey" game.


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