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42ND STREET
1933, Warner Bros., 89 min, USA, Dir: Lloyd Bacon

An aging Broadway director puts on one last show and ably handles constant complications - including a last-minute replacement when the star of his production breaks her ankle. The most famous of the Warner Bros. musicals is also one of the fastest and funniest, thanks to expert work by Ginger Rogers and a plethora of Warner’s contract players. Optimistic and sexy yet sharply aware of the Depression's ravages, this beautifully choreographed - by Busby Berkeley - classic influenced later films from ALL THAT JAZZ to BOOGIE NIGHTS. With Dick Powell and Ruby Keeler.


DOCTOR X
1932, Warner Bros., 76 min, USA, Dir: Michael Curtiz

A journalist (Lee Tracy) follows a trail of bodies left by the cannibalistic Moon Killer, eventually arriving at the medical academy run by Dr. Xavier (Lionel Atwill). With no shortage of suspects among his staff, Doctor X and the reporter race to identify the culprit before lovely Joan (Fay Wray) becomes his next victim. Curtiz and many of his cast and crew members soon would reteam for another two-color Technicolor thriller, MYSTERY OF THE WAX MUSEUM.


NO WAY OUT
1950, 20th Century Fox, 106 min, USA, Dir: Joseph L. Mankiewicz

After a man dies while under the care of new black doctor Luther Brooks (Sidney Poitier in his feature debut), the patient’s racist brother (Richard Widmark) refuses to allow an autopsy that would prove the physician’s actions were justified. As tensions in the community escalate, Dr. Brooks gets his autopsy the only way he can - by giving himself up for murder. Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee make brief appearances in this tense drama, one of the most blistering critiques of racism ever filmed.


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