FAMILY PLOT
1976, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s dazzling, masterful and overlooked final film follows a phony medium (Barbara Harris) and a dim-witted cab driver/out-of-work actor (Bruce Dern) who cross swords with a ruthless, duplicitous criminal couple (William Devane and Karen Black). Greed, kidnappings, jewel heists and car chases ensue.


TOPAZ
1969, Universal, 143 min, US, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Director Alfred Hitchcock delves deeper into the world of Cold War espionage he’d plumbed in TORN CURTAIN, adapting this thriller from Leon Uris’ fact-based novel about the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. When a defector reveals the Soviet plan to install nuclear missiles in Cuba, the CIA turns to French spy André Devereaux (Frederick Stafford) to gather intelligence. Complicating his work is a cadre of French double-agents codenamed “Topaz.” With Michel Piccoli and Philippe Noiret.


TORN CURTAIN
1966, Universal, 128 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

With spy films all the rage in the mid-1960s, director Alfred Hitchcock delves into cloak-and-dagger territory in this underrated Cold War thriller. Physicist Paul Newman defects to East Germany with fiancée Julie Andrews - but he is actually a double agent on the hunt for missile technology. Fast-moving and beautifully shot, TORN CURTAIN includes indelible supporting performances from Lila Kedrova, Tamara Toumanova and Wolfgang Kieling (as a particularly hard-to-kill security officer), and a tense museum sequence that inspired a similar scene in Wes Anderson’s THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL.


Syndicate content