SAMURAI MARATHON 1855
2019, 103 min, Dir: Bernard Rose

Bernard Rose’s astounding take on Japanese jidaigeki, or “period drama,” is set in the year 1855. After decades of isolation, Japan has started receiving trade ships from the rest of the world; amidst the new arrivals is an American merchant captain who brings with him whiskey, photography and, most important, pistols. These weapons are seen as a threat to the ancient Samurai and their code of honor, so the Annaka clan devise a test to determine if their men are ready should battle be necessary: a marathon in which the winner may ask of the master anything he may desire. But the Shogunate is fearful of the Annaka daimyo (feudal lord) and awaits word from their spy to see if they need to deploy their full might to crush the clan to smithereens. The stage is set for one spellbinding confrontation and an awe-inspiring marathon race against time. With a mesmerizing score by Philip Glass.


MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS
1985, Janus Films, 121 min, USA/Japan, Dir: Paul Schrader

The tumultuous life of Japanese writer Yukio Mishima serves as the subject for what many consider director Paul Schrader’s masterpiece. To a score by Philip Glass, the film interweaves several narratives (each with its own distinctive look) drawn from Mishima’s youth, his novels and the attempted coup that ended in his ritual suicide. “The most unconventional biopic I've ever seen, and one of the best.” – Roger Ebert. In Japanese and English with English subtitles.


CANDYMAN
1992, Sony Repertory, 99 min, USA, Dir: Bernard Rose

Perhaps the greatest horror film of the ’90s is this cerebral and chilling classic by director Bernard Rose, based on Clive Barker's short story “The Forbidden.” Virginia Madsen plays a grad student researching urban legends when she comes across the tale of Candyman, a frightening one-armed man who appears when you say his name into a mirror five times; he’s played brilliantly by Tony Todd. Score by Philip Glass.


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