LADY OSCAR
1979, Ciné Tamaris, 124 min, Japan/France, Dir: Jacques Demy

Adapted by director Jacques Demy and writer Patricia Knop from the Japanese manga The Rose of Versailles, this drama centers on an aristocratic young woman brought up as a man just prior to the French Revolution. With a father who’d hoped for a male heir, Oscar François de Jarjayes (Catriona MacColl) is raised to follow his footsteps in a military career; when she is eventually appointed to lead the Royal Guard, Lady Oscar enters the secluded and decadent court at Versailles. But as the plight of the common people deepens and popular tensions flare, she finds herself torn between a sense of duty and a young love committed to the cause of change (Barry Stokes). Quintessentially Demy in its aesthetics and subject matter, LADY OSCAR features lavish visuals and a score by the director’s longtime collaborator, Michel Legrand.


THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND
2018, Netflix, 122 min, USA/France/Iran, Dir: Orson Welles

Legendary director Jake Hannaford (John Huston) celebrates his 70th birthday - which also happens to be the final day of his life - with a Hollywood party to end all Hollywood parties, a gathering in which the aging filmmaker confronts friends, enemies and his own demons in a whirlwind of vibrant celebration and scathing bitterness. Director Orson Welles calls back to his own CITIZEN KANE with another portrait of a larger-than-life titan, while also riffing on European art cinema of the era and looking forward to the new Hollywood that was already eclipsing his own. Peter Bogdanovich stars as a fictionalized version of himself - a hot young director surpassing his idol in terms of success and prestige - as do other major filmmakers and historians like Paul Mazursky, Dennis Hopper, Henry Jaglom and Joseph McBride. A love and hate letter to Hollywood that still looks modern more than 40 years after Welles began it, THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND is a late masterpiece by one of the greatest directors who ever lived.


F FOR FAKE
1974, Janus Films, 85 min, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

Orson Welles appears as "himself" (but which self? Master director? Magician? Media manipulator?) in this delightful essay on the nature of illusion, focusing on all types of fakery and fakers, including notorious art forger Elmyr de Hory and fraudulent Howard Hughes biographer Clifford Irving. With Oja Kodar and Peter Bogdanovich.


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