KING KONG (1976)
1976, Paramount, 134 min, Dir: John Guillermin

Oil executive Charles Grodin and paleontologist Jeff Bridges set sail for a previously unexplored island, where they discover a gigantic ape; Jessica Lange (in her feature debut) is the beauty who charms the beast. Produced by Dino De Laurentiis, this hit remake takes a lighter tone than the original, and Rick Baker and Carlo Rambaldi’s work bringing Kong to life earned the film a visual effects Oscar. “The moviemaking team has come up with a pop classic that can stand in our affections right next to the original version.” - Pauline Kael, The New Yorker.


THE LAST VALLEY
1971, Buena Vista Pictures, 128 min, UK/USA, Dir: James Clavell

Writer-director James Clavell’s epic adventure takes place in the shadow of the Thirty Years War, which ravaged Germany in the 17th century. One remote region remains unscathed when Omar Sharif arrives in search of refuge; unfortunately, he’s been followed into the valley by Michael Caine and his band of mercenary soldiers. With superb performances, a highly literate script and one of John Barry’s best scores, THE LAST VALLEY brings a little-known period of history to vivid life.


THE BLACK HOLE
1979, Disney, 98 min, USA, Dir: Gary Nelson

It is the year 2130, and the spaceship Palomino and its crew come across a lost vessel at the edge of an immense black hole. The vessel is manned by robots and one human, Dr. Hans Reinhardt (Maximilian Schell), a prestigious scientist who plans to enter the foreboding void. This terrifically haunting sci-fi gem was nominated for Best Cinematography and Special Effects Oscars in 1980.


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