1985, Janus Films, 121 min, USA/Japan, Dir: Paul Schrader

The tumultuous life of Japanese writer Yukio Mishima serves as the subject for what many consider director Paul Schrader’s masterpiece. To a score by Philip Glass, the film interweaves several narratives (each with its own distinctive look) drawn from Mishima’s youth, his novels and the attempted coup that ended in his ritual suicide. “The most unconventional biopic I've ever seen, and one of the best.” – Roger Ebert. In Japanese and English with English subtitles.

1982, Park Circus/MGM, 86 min, USA, Dir: Godfrey Reggio

The most famous and well-known of the QATSI trilogy, KOYAANISQATSI explores our perceptions of the world. The title of the film is taken from the Hopi word meaning "life out of balance," and that concept is used to examine the conflicts between technology and the environment. Philip Glass’ stunning score accompanies Reggio’s exploration of the idea that we don’t live with nature any longer - we live off of it. Perhaps the best-received of Reggio’s works, KOYANNISQATSI has a massive cult following and has influenced filmmakers and filmgoers alike.

2012, IFC Films, 124 min, USA, Dir: Walter Salles

One of the most celebrated novels in American literature finally reaches the big screen with director Walter Salles’ adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s autobiographical look at the birth of the Beat generation. Writer Sal Paradise (Sam Riley) takes a formative road trip with the free-spirited Dean Moriarty (Garrett Hedlund) and his girlfriend, Marylou (Kristen Stewart). With Amy Adams, Viggo Mortensen and Kirsten Dunst.

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