MAD LOVE
1935, Warner Bros., 68 min, USA, Dir: Karl Freund

“Dead hands that live ... and love ... and kill!” It's macabre shenanigans involving amputated hands as Grand Guignol theater star Yvonne Orlac (Frances Drake) goes to brilliant - but crazy - surgeon Dr. Gogol (Peter Lorre) as a last resort when her concert pianist husband, Stephen (Colin Clive, of FRANKENSTEIN), has his hands mangled in a train accident. Gogol, insanely in love with Yvonne and willing to do anything to steal her away, transplants the hands of a guillotined murderer onto the comatose Stephen. Counting on the highly suggestive nature of the neurotic pianist, Gogol makes him believe he also possesses the dead killer’s personality. An intense, delirious adaptation of French writer Maurice Renard’s oft-filmed novel The Hands of Orlac.


CEASE FIRE
1953, Kino Lorber, 75 min, USA, Dir: Owen Crump

This unique and unforgettable war documentary (one of the first of its kind in 3-D) features real American soldiers re-enacting a Korean War operation as Lieutenant Thompson and 13 others in his platoon face countless hurdles that all lead to a harrowing finale. The re-enactments are spliced with real battle footage from the mission that blurs the line between reality and fiction. The New York Times called it “a robust, hair-raising realization of the ruggedness of the foot soldiers’ war in the ugly hills of Korea.”


THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD
1951, Warner Bros., 87 min, USA, Dir: Christian Nyby

Produced by the great Howard Hawks, this is the first alien-invasion film and arguably the first modern horror film - a prototype for everything that would follow, from ALIEN to FRIDAY THE 13th to HALLOWEEN. A fast-moving freight train of a movie, filled with Hawks’ trademark snappy, overlapping dialogue and some of the scariest moments ever on film, it's the STAGECOACH of horror films. It also demonstrates the dangers of electric blankets. With Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan and "Gunsmoke's" James Arness as the Thing.


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