THE CITY OF LOST CHILDREN
LA CITÉ DES ENFANTS PERDUS
1995, Sony Pictures Classics, 112 min, France/Germany/Spain, Dir: Marc Caro, Jean-Pierre Jeunet

The long-planned second feature from the creative team behind DELICATESSEN is just as bizarre, sinister and wildly imaginative as its predecessor, mixing elements of Dr. Caligari, Victor Hugo and Rube Goldberg into the story of a kind-hearted circus strongman (Ron Perlman) and his coquettish 7-year old side-kick (Judith Vittet), who attempt to stop a wicked scientist (Daniel Emilfork) from stealing the dreams of little children.


THE COMFORT OF STRANGERS
1990, 107 min, USA/Italy/UK, Dir: Paul Schrader

Noted playwright Harold Pinter penned this sinister adaptation of Ian McEwan’s novel about twisted relationships. Considering marriage, British couple Rupert Everett and Natasha Richardson travel to Venice, where well-to-do bar owner Christopher Walken and wife Helen Mirren take an unnatural interest in them.


NATIONAL LAMPOON’S CHRISTMAS VACATION
1989, Warner Bros., 97 min, USA, Dir: Jeremiah S. Chechik

Screenwriter John Hughes expertly juggles farce and sentiment in this delightful holiday film, perhaps the best in the entire VACATION series. Suburban dad Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) finds his plans for the perfect Christmas going awry thanks to a visit from obnoxious brother-in-law Eddie (a hilarious Randy Quaid), but the slapstick antics give way to a surprisingly touching finale that perfectly sums up Hughes’ feelings about home and family. With Beverly D’Angelo, Diane Ladd.


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