CALL NORTHSIDE 777
1948, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: Henry Hathaway

In the late 1940s, hardhitting action director Hathaway was the pioneer of a new breed of startlingly neo-realistic, noirish crime film. Pictures like HOUSE ON 92nd STREET and KISS OF DEATH helped to cement his reputation as a genre master, and there's no better example of his straight-from-the-headlines style than in this superior suspenser, with James Stewart trying to prove that convicted killer Richard Conte is innocent. With Lee J. Cobb, Helen Walker.


LEAVE HER TO HEAVEN
1946, 20th Century Fox, 111 min, USA, Dir: John Stahl

Exhibit A in the argument that film noir isn't always black-and-white. Don't let the stunningly lush Technicolor fool you - this big-budget soap opera has the blackest of hearts and is as perverse and malignant as it got in the ’40s. Novelist Cornel Wilde falls for gorgeous Gene Tierney but has no idea of the darkness lurking behind those emerald eyes. A rare chance to see Leon Shamroy's Oscar-winning cinematography on the big screen.


ANASTASIA
1956, 20th Century Fox, 105 min, USA, Dir: Anatole Litvak

Ingrid Bergman’s return to Hollywood brought her a Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the title role of this intriguing historical drama. Among the first casualties of the 1917 Russian Revolution were Tsar Nicholas II and his family, though rumors persisted for years that daughter Anastasia had escaped execution. With a £10 million inheritance on the line, General Bounine (Yul Brynner) grooms a mysterious young woman (Bergman) to play Anastasia, but the more time he spends with her, the more he begins to suspect she’s the real thing. Helen Hayes is wonderful as the dowager Empress who will decide the claim.


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