TOMBSTONE RASHOMON
2017, 83 min, USA, Dir: Alex Cox

Alex Cox’s most recent feature is an experiment with the Western genre that throws the established history of the shoot-out at the O.K. Corral into disarray. When a time-traveling documentary film crew embarks to record the famous event, they arrive a day late and must interview participants and witnesses to piece together their conflicting details of the experience. Cox’s attempt to create “the most comprehensive and unusual gunfight picture ever made” becomes a prism of diverging narratives in direct homage to Akira Kurosawa’s classic RASHOMON.


TRAIL OF ROBIN HOOD
1950, Paramount, 67 min, USA, Dir: William Witney

J.C. Aldridge (Emory Parnell) is out to corner the Christmas tree market and has bought out all of his competitors except a retired movie star (Jack Holt). Aldridge’s foreman is even more ruthless, sabotaging Holt's operation to sell trees at a higher price. But Holt has Roy Rogers in his corner, fighting to help him get his trees to market. The cast is packed with Western stars including Rex Allen, Allan "Rocky" Lane, Tom Tyler, Monte Hale and, of course, Trigger.


ON THE NIGHT STAGE
1915, 62 min, USA, Dir: Reginald Barker

William S. Hart, plays “Silent” Texas Smith, a man to whom actions speak louder than words in this Western. A new parson (Robert Edeson) converts saloon dancer Belle Shields (Rhea Mitchell), drawing her away from her stagecoach robber boyfriend (Hart) – until she attracts the attention of a ne’er do well gambler. While Edeson received top billing, Hart’s charismatic virility and acting genius made him a natural standout in his second feature length film. Producer Thomas H. Ince assigned Reginald Barker to direct but the film contains the unmistakable stamp of Hart’s intuitive grasp of the new medium. With its terrifically staged, massive saloon fight, this is a wonderfully enjoyable example of early American feature filmmaking.


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