2015, Bleecker Street Media, 102 min, Dir: Gavin Hood

In this timely thriller, British colonel Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren) conducts a top-secret drone operation tracking terrorists in Kenya. When intelligence reveals the group is planning a suicide bombing, the mission becomes more urgent – and more fraught with complications when a 9-year old girl enters the kill zone. This riveting look at the moral ambiguities of modern-day warfare costars Aaron Paul, Barkhad Abdi and, in one of his final roles, Alan Rickman as Powell’s commanding officer.

Die Blechtrommel
1979, Janus Films, 163 min, Dir: Volker Schlöndorff

Adapted from the acclaimed Günter Grass novel, this Best Foreign-Language Film Oscar winner stars David Bennent as Oskar Matzerath, a boy whose refusal to grow up makes this one of the most bizarre coming-of-age film ever. Born near the Polish-German border in the 1920s, Oskar has a ringside seat to the rise of Nazism, and uses his tin drum and glass-shattering voice to display his disgust with the adult world. An unforgettable film (including at least a couple of sequences that will make you squirm).

1944, Sony Repertory, 85 min, USA, Dir: André De Toth

Produced before the end of WWII, this indictment of Nazi evil was remarkably prescient. Alexander Knox is chilling as Wilhelm Grimm, a German officer whose war crimes unfold in flashback during a Nuremberg-like trial; Marsha Hunt gives one of her best performances as Grimm’s former lover. Oscar nominated for Best Original Story.

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