1951, Warner Bros., 69 min, USA, Dir: John Huston

Until the last decade, this was regarded as one of director John Huston’s lower-profile pictures, but with each passing year its stature and merits grow. A profoundly moving rendition of Stephen Crane’s classic novel of the Civil War, with an exceptional Audie Murphy as Henry Fleming, the young soldier wracked by self-doubt, and the offbeat Bill Mauldin (the most famous political/war cartoonist of the era) equally good as his friend. With Royal Dano, Arthur Hunnicutt.

1941, Warner Bros., 134 min, USA, Dir: Howard Hawks

Gary Cooper stars as Alvin C. York, a hillbilly sharpshooter and pacifist who is drafted into World War I, only to become one of the most celebrated army soldiers when he single handedly attacks and captures a German position, using his turkey-shoot expertise. Winner of two Oscars for Best Actor (Cooper) and Best Film Editing, with an additional nine nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Walter Brennan) and Best Supporting Actress (Margaret Wycherly).

HENRY V (1989)
1989, MGM Repertory, 137 min, UK, Dir: Kenneth Branagh

Kenneth Branagh became an international star with his debut directorial effort, in which he also stars as the warrior king of the title. Emma Thompson is Henry's love interest, and Ian Holm, Christian Bale and Judi Dench are just a few of the supporting players. A film filled with both lyrical dialogue and smashing action sequences, HENRY V is as exciting as cinema gets.

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