KING OF HEARTS
1966, Cohen Media, 102 min, France/Italy, Dir: Philippe de Broca

During World War I, Scottish soldier Private Plumpick (Alan Bates) is sent on a mission to a village in the French countryside to disarm a bomb set by the retreating German army. Plumpick encounters a strange town occupied by the former residents of the local psychiatric hospital, who escaped after the villagers deserted. Assuming roles like bishop, duke, barber and circus ringmaster, they warmly accept the visitor as their King of Hearts. With his reconnaissance and bomb-defusing mission looming, Plumpick starts to prefer the acceptance of the insane locals over the insanity of the war raging outside. Since its debut, KING OF HEARTS has become a worldwide cult favorite and stands out as one of de Broca’s most memorable films.


INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS
2009, Swank, 153 min, Germany/USA, Dir: Quentin Tarantino

This WWII-set box office hit stars Brad Pitt as Lt. Aldo Raine, who leads the Basterds, a paramilitary squad that terrorizes the Nazis with quick strikes in enemy territory. The fighters team up with a French theater owner and devise a plot to kill Hitler at a screening of a new propaganda film. Christoph Waltz earned a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his turn as duplicitous SS officer Hans Landa. “Quentin Tarantino’s INGLOURIOUS BASTERDS is a big, bold, audacious war movie that will annoy some, startle others and demonstrate once again that he’s the real thing, a director of quixotic delights.” – Roger Ebert.


1917
2019, Universal, 119 min, UK/USA, Dir: Sam Mendes

Oscar-winning director of SKYFALL, SPECTRE and AMERICAN BEAUTY, Sam Mendes, brings his singular vision to this World War I epic, 1917. At the height of the First World War, two young British soldiers, Schofield (CAPTAIN FANTASTIC’s George MacKay) and Blake (GAME OF THRONES’ Dean-Charles Chapman) are given a seemingly impossible mission. In a race against time, they must cross enemy territory and deliver a message that will stop a deadly attack on hundreds of soldiers—Blake’s own brother among them. Nominated for 10 Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Music Score (Thomas Newman), and Best Cinematography (Roger Deakins).


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