FAMILY PLOT
1976, Universal, 120 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock’s dazzling, masterful and overlooked final film follows a phony medium (Barbara Harris) and a dim-witted cab driver/out-of-work actor (Bruce Dern) who cross swords with a ruthless, duplicitous criminal couple (William Devane and Karen Black). Greed, kidnappings, jewel heists and car chases ensue.


THE LAST OF THE SIX
LE DERNIER DES SIX
1941, Gaumont, 90 min, France, Dir: Georges Lacombe

When a group of old friends prepares to share their fortunes with one another, their meeting is threatened by a series of mysterious murders. LE DERNIER DES SIX, though directed by Georges Lacombe, shows Henri-Georges Clouzot’s unmistakable hand in shaping the script, setting up the striking oppositions between grim, atmospheric crime scenes and the near-slapstick interactions of Inspector Wems (Pierre Fresnay) with his histrionic, high-maintenance girlfriend (played with flair by Clouzot’s then-girlfriend, Suzy Delair).


POISON IVY
LA MOME VERT-DE-GRIS
1952, Pathe, 97 min, France, Dir: Bernard Borderie

The first of Eddie Constantine’s (France’s biggest star of the 1950s) jokey, self-referential Lemmy Caution tales, LA MOME VERT-DE-GRIS also features blonde bombshell Dominique Wilms, who leaves every man she meets during the film’s delirious action more than a little breathless. As Bertrand Tavernier noted, Constantine’s alter ego Lemmy Caution is the template for James Bond - though he’s clearly more hangdog and unkempt than the suave British spy. But Constantine wins us over with his crooked smile, his love of liquor and women, and his reckless courage in the face of gunfire. LA MOME VERT-DE-GRIS makes it clear why Paris was at Eddie’s feet in the ’50s, and you’ll want to scratch that itch for more Lemmy!


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