SPACEHUNTER: ADVENTURES IN THE FORBIDDEN ZONE
1983, Sony Repertory, 90 min, USA/Canada, Dir: Lamont Johnson

Forced to land on the plague-ridden planet Terra XI, three women find themselves in the clutches of the evil dictator Overdog (Michael Ironside). Their only hope lies in the hands of the rogue scavenger Wolff (Peter Strauss) and his guide Niki (Molly Ringwald), who face a series of treacherous obstacles on the barren planet. With spectacular special effects and impressive 3-D imagery, this is one of the overlooked gems of the 1980s space opera craze.


METALSTORM: THE DESTRUCTION OF JARED-SYN
1983, Universal, 84 min, USA, Dir: Charles Band

Produced and directed by B-movie maestro Charles Band, this highly enjoyable cult film takes place on the mysterious desert planet of Lemuria, where humans gather in small mining towns to scavenge for crystals imbued with mystical powers. Dressed suspiciously like Mel Gibson’s Max Rockatansky, space ranger Dogen (Jeffrey Byron) sets out to stop the murderous villain Jared-Syn, memorably played by THE ROAD WARRIOR’s Michael Preston. This MAD MAX knockoff is a surprisingly fun adventure that takes wasteland sci-fi to new, intergalactic places with some truly outstanding visuals.


THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD
1951, Warner Bros., 87 min, USA, Dir: Christian Nyby

Produced by the great Howard Hawks, this is the first alien-invasion film and arguably the first modern horror film - a prototype for everything that would follow, from ALIEN to FRIDAY THE 13th to HALLOWEEN. A fast-moving freight train of a movie, filled with Hawks’ trademark snappy, overlapping dialogue and some of the scariest moments ever on film, it's the STAGECOACH of horror films. It also demonstrates the dangers of electric blankets. With Kenneth Tobey, Margaret Sheridan and "Gunsmoke's" James Arness as the Thing.


Syndicate content