LAPSIS
2021, Film Movement, 108 min, USA, Dir: Noah Hutton

New York, an alternate present: the quantum computing revolution has begun and investors are lining their pockets in the quantum trading market. Building the network, though, requires miles of infrastructure to be laid between huge magnetic cubes by “cablers” – unprotected gig workers who compete against robots to pull wires over rough terrain. Queens delivery man Ray Tincelli (Dean Imperial) is skeptical of new technology, and the buy-in to start cabling is steep, but he struggles to support himself and his ailing younger brother, who suffers from a mysterious illness. So, when Ray scores a shady permit, he believes their fortunes may have finally changed. What he doesn't expect is to be pulled into a conspiracy involving hostile cablers, corporate greed and the mysterious “Lapsis” who may have previously owned his cabling medallion.


THE MIDNIGHT SKY
2020, Netflix, 116 min, USA, Dir: George Clooney

This post-apocalyptic tale follows Augustine (George Clooney), a lonely scientist in the Arctic, as he races to stop Sully (Felicity Jones) and her fellow astronauts from returning home to a mysterious global catastrophe. Clooney directs the adaptation of Lily Brooks-Dalton’s acclaimed novel Good Morning, Midnight, co-starring David Oyelowo, Kyle Chandler, Demián Bichir and Tiffany Boone.


PG: PSYCHO GOREMAN
2020, 92 min, Canada, Dir: Steven Kostanski

Indomitable Mimi (Nita-Josée Hanna) and her mild-mannered older brother Luke (Owen Myre) unwittingly revive a malevolent alien who happens to be buried in their backyard. The siblings name him Psycho Goreman (PG for short) and tame him with his own magical amulet, now in the possession of young Mimi, who forces PG to bend to her every childish whim despite his desire to destroy everything in existence. Elsewhere in the galaxy, PG’s cronies and captors catch wind of his reemergence and chart a course for Earth – and the bloodiest interstellar showdown this side of Gigax. Canadian cult filmmaker Steven Kostanski (THE VOID) kicks things into overdrive with painstakingly detailed world-building inhabited by even more painstakingly crafted creatures animated by all the classic tricks of the trade: puppetry, miniatures, stop motion, O.G. computer effects, and presumably gallons of liquid latex and blood. – Nicole McControversy


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