DORA OR THE SEXUAL NEUROSES OF OUR PARENTS
DORA ODER DIE SEXUELLEN NEUROSEN UNSERER ELTERN
2015, 90 min, Switzerland/Germany, Dir: Stina Werenfels

Mentally disabled Dora (Victoria Schulz) has spent much of her 18 years under psychotropic sedation. When her mother, Kristin (Jenny Schily), decides to stop the medication, Dora’s world opens and she begins a relationship with an unscrupulous perfume salesman (Lars Eidinger) eager to take advantage of her newfound lust for life. Dora’s parents are horrified by her relationship and eventual pregnancy, but are determined to both protect their daughter and allow her to make her own choices as an adult. In adapting Lukas Bärfuss’ challenging play, director Stina Werenfels and co-writer Boris Treyer emphasize the parallel struggles of both mother and daughter, examining broader issues of female sexuality and motherhood. Lukas Strebel’s camerawork earned a Cinelab Award for its innovative use of Dora’s point of view. In German with English subtitles.


REQUIREMENTS TO BE A NORMAL PERSON
REQUISITOS PARA SER UNA PERSONA NORMAL
2015, 90 min, Spain, Dir: Leticia Dolera

Everybody tries to fit in, but few people go about it as methodically as Maria de las Montañas (writer-director Leticia Dolera), who hopes to reach normality through a seven-item checklist. Her mentally challenged younger brother (Jordi Llodrà) and overweight friend (Manuel Burque) seem to have most of the bases covered, and the success of Maria’s quest may boil down to just being herself. Brightly colored and boasting a jangly folk score from Luthea Salom, this romantic comedy is, as one might hope from its title, charmingly eccentric. Winner of the Best New Screenwriter, Cinematography and Editing Awards at the Málaga Spanish Film Festival. In Spanish with English subtitles.


THE BIG PARADE
1925, Warner Bros., 151 min, USA, Dir: King Vidor

King Vidor’s 1925 account of World War I delivers both epic sweep and intimate emotional moments in its tale of a young soldier (John Gilbert) who finds solace in the arms of a French woman (Renée Adorée) amidst the horror of war. Made just seven years after the end of the Great War, the film was the first war picture to tell its story from the point of view of a soldier. While the first half of the film is part light-hearted comedy, the second depicts war very realistically.


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