NOW, VOYAGER
1942, Warner Bros., 117 min, USA, Dir: Irving Rapper

“Don't ask for the moon - we have the stars.” In this classic Bette Davis soap opera, the great actress plays a repressed spinster who finds love with Paul Henreid after psychiatrist Claude Rains encourages her to stand up to her domineering mother and to embrace life. Max Steiner's Oscar-winning score provides just the right amount of emphasis in this manipulative but undeniably effective, intelligent Hollywood sudser. “…a highly narcotic, swoon-inducing romance in the Bette Davis canon.” - Jeremiah Kipp, Slant Magazine


BUS STOP
1956, 20th Century Fox, 96 min, USA, Dir: Joshua Logan

Marilyn Monroe stunned critics and fans alike with her heartbreakingly tender performance as a truck-stop singer who falls in love with naive young cowpoke Don Murray, in this beautiful, bittersweet drama based on the William Inge play. With Betty Field, Arthur O’Connell.


SHANE
1953, Paramount, 118 min, USA, Dir: George Stevens

George Stevens infuses the Western genre with mythic grandeur in this timeless classic. Alan Ladd is at his most iconic as the title character, an ex-gunfighter forced out of retirement when a family of homesteaders (Van Heflin, Jean Arthur, Brandon de Wilde) comes under attack by a vicious rancher’s hired guns. Jack Palance is one of the most threatening villains in movie history, and the film itself is both a summing up of the Western genre and a sign of things to come in later masterworks such as UNFORGIVEN. One of the most influential films ever made - and one of the most entertaining. Loyal Griggs won an Oscar for Best Cinematography.


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