LAST TANGO IN PARIS
1972, Park Circus/MGM, 136 min, France, Italy, Dir: Bernardo Bertolucci

Marlon Brando gives one of the finest performances of his career in a sensual exploration of the dark night of one man’s soul - a movie that sent shockwaves through not just the motion picture industry but society at large when it was initially released and continues to generate controversy to this day. Expatriate American Paul (Brando) tries to exorcise the demons unleashed by his wife’s suicide with the erotic assistance of young waif Jeanne (Maria Schneider). But there’s no escape and Paul’s lovemaking brings him neither the desired relief nor intimacy, something that is ruthlessly charted in director Bernardo Bertolucci’s erotic masterpiece.


MR. SOFT TOUCH
1949, Columbia [Sony Repertory], 93 min, USA, Dir: Henry Levin, Gordon Douglas

This ultra-rare comedy-noir hybrid features Glenn Ford as a returning WWII vet who knocks over the Frisco nightclub he used to own. When the gangster owners come gunning for him, Ford finds sanctuary by getting arrested for a misdemeanor - only to find himself back in hot water when he’s sprung by a do-gooder social worker (Evelyn Keyes) for the holidays. Directed by Henry Levin and Gordon Douglas, this is one of the oddest combinations we’ve ever seen: romantic comedy, schmaltzy sentiment and hardboiled noir. “In headlong flight he paused… to live a lifetime in 36 thrill-packed hours… with this woman!” Not on DVD!


THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS
1971, Universal, 98 min, USA, Dir: Anthony Harvey

This charmingly goofy, surprisingly romantic Sherlock Holmes iteration finds the famous duo in modern-day New York, with Holmes (George C. Scott) an obsessive paranoid and a female Watson (Joanne Woodward), a psychiatrist helplessly fascinated by the detective.


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