RED HEADED WOMAN
1932, Warner Bros., 79 min, USA, Dir: Jack Conway

The legendary Jean Harlow delivers a star-making performance in this provocative pre-Hays Code comedy as a charming gold digger who sleeps her way to fortune. Secretary Lillian Andrews sets her sights on her boss, eventually luring him away from his happy marriage to his childhood sweetheart. But instead of making a big splash in society, she is rejected. After casting her attention on a coal king, Lillian realizes that she loves her French chauffeur (Charles Boyer). The film is often cited as one of the motion pictures that brought about more stringent censorship.


THREE WISE GIRLS
1932, Sony Repertory, 68 min, USA, Dir: William Beaudine

Jean Harlow, Mae Clarke and Marie Prevost are the wise girls of the title in this pre-Code look at life and love in New York City. When small-town soda jerk Cassie (Harlow) arrives in Manhattan, she catches the eye of a wealthy - but married - man (Walter Byron), and her two friends are of differing opinions on whether Cassie should pursue the affair. Robert Riskin provided the dialogue here, and Andy Devine makes a brief but memorable appearance as a chauffeur.


MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW
1937, Universal, 91 min, USA, Dir: Leo McCarey

This Depression-era drama stars Victor Moore and Beulah Bondi as an elderly couple who lose their home to foreclosure and hope to move in with one of their five children – none of whom wants them both. Named to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2010, this was director Leo McCarey’s favorite of his films; other famous fans include Orson Welles, Errol Morris and Japanese screenwriter Kōgo Noda, who patterned TOKYO STORY after it.


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