ROAD TO NOWHERE
2010, Monterey Media, 121 min, USA, Dir: Monte Hellman

In this expectation-confounding, enigmatic film-within-a-film, a director (cleverly named Mitchell Haven, and played by an excellent Tygh Runyan) struggles with a series of unsettling catastrophes that beset his small film based on a "true story" murder mystery and the following disappearance of a young woman. Haven's lead actress (played with alternating relish and calm assurance by Shannyn Sossamon) bears an uncanny resemblance to the actual missing femme fatale, and the crew begins to uncomfortably wonder if the actress and murderer are one and the same. Meanwhile, Haven's obsession with his beautiful lead grows deeper and more profound. Shot with economic practicality on the Canon 5D and using traditional still-photo lenses, Monte Hellman's mind-bending mood piece is as aesthetically hypnotic as it is emotionally beguiling. Official selection of the Venice Film Festival, Palm Springs International Film Festival and SXSW. "A certifiable masterpiece." - Film Comment. "May also be as significant to the indie feature as AVATAR is to the popcorn movie." - The New York Times. "Monte Hellman's first feature film in 21 years is one of his finest and deepest, a twin peak to his 1971 masterpiece, TWO-LANE BLACKTOP." - Variety. Be sure to check out the trailer for ROAD TO NOWHERE, dubbed by the Austin Post as “the most beautiful trailer ever.”


ROPE
1948, Universal, 80 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

This startling Alfred Hitchcock film was doubly daring for 1948: First, it risked depicting the Leopold & Loeb-like tale of homosexual lovers committing murder solely for the thrill. If that wasn’t enough, it told the tale in a series of long, 10-minute takes, unlike anything any director had previously attempted. Having passed over the heads of most audiences when originally released, the film is a revelation by today’s standards. With James Stewart, Farley Granger and John Dall (GUN CRAZY).


STRANGERS ON A TRAIN
1951, Warner Bros., 101 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

A chance encounter between tennis champion Guy (Farley Granger) and psychopath Bruno (Robert Walker) on a train triggers an unstoppable race toward double murder. Hitchcock’s classic thriller is a finely-tuned engine of suspense, taking barely a breath as it steams through a spine-tingling story of fate, coincidence, guilt and psychopathology - favorite themes of noir writer Patricia Highsmith, whose novel was adapted by the great Raymond Chandler. With Ruth Roman.


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