2010: THE YEAR WE MAKE CONTACT
1984, Warner Bros., 116 min, USA, Dir: Peter Hyams

Adapted from Arthur C. Clarke's follow-up novel, this underrated sequel to 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY follows a joint U.S.-Soviet mission sent to discover what happened to the Discovery spacecraft. Roy Scheider, John Lithgow, Bob Balaban and Helen Mirren lead the team of astronauts, with Keir Dullea and Douglas Rain (the voice of HAL 9000) returning from the original film. “This is a good movie. … Once we have freed 2010 of the comparisons with Kubrick's masterpiece, what we are left with is a good-looking, sharp-edged, entertaining, exciting space opera.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.


PERFECT BLUE
PÂFEKUTO BURÛ
1997, GKIDS, 81 min, Japan, Dir: Satoshi Kon

The groundbreaking first film from legendary director Satoshi Kon is an iconic psychological thriller that has frequently been hailed as one of the most important animated films of all time. Rising pop star Mima has quit singing to pursue a career as an actress and model, but her fans aren’t ready to see her go. Encouraged by her managers, Mima takes on a recurring role on a popular TV show, when suddenly her handlers and collaborators begin turning up murdered. Harboring feelings of guilt and haunted by visions of her former self, Mima’s reality and fantasy meld into a frenzied paranoia. As her stalker closes in, in person and online, the threat he poses is more real than even Mima knows. Featuring strong adult content, this film is only recommended for adults 17 years and older.


WHO KILLED CAPTAIN ALEX?
2010, AGFA, 64 min, Uganda, Dir: Nabwana I.G.G.

Welcome to Wakaliwood, Uganda, home of vanguards of DIY commando cinema writer-producer-director Nabwana Isaac Godfrey Geoffrey (IGG) and producer-star Alan Ssali Hofmanis. This crack crew of self-taught filmmakers and martial arts aficionados produce dozens of gonzo action films in the Kampala ghetto with budgets that rarely exceed $200. “WHO KILLED CAPTAIN ALEX? features Ugandan commandos, kung fu, a MIDI version of Seal’s ‘Kiss From a Rose,’ a rambunctious (and sometimes farting) in-film commentary track, and some more supa action. It’s a bat-shit crazy milestone to be honored in the film history books.” - Nick Allen, The Film Stage.


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